Coleophora laricella (Coleophoridae)

larch casebearer


Adults:

Coleophora laricella, the larch casebearer, adult. Adults are tiny (4 mm) silvery-brown moths with narrow fringed wings.


Larvae:

Coleophora laricella larvae. 5-6 mm long brown larvae. Found within a piece of hollow needle.


Damage:

Needles damaged by mining of larval Coleophora laricella. Eggs are laid singly on needles from late May until early July. Newly hatched larvae mine into needles, hollow out a portion, line it with silk and then sever it from the rest of the needle. Larvae move about, feed and then pupate in their needle case.


Principal Hosts:

Western larch.

Economic Importance:

Trees are not killed by this pest but heavy defoliation can significantly reduce annual wood production.

References and Links:

EAG: 479-480; FC: 174.

See HForest and JP17.

Additional Images:

see white case of larvae larvae on needles